• History,  Politics

    How Germany Tried to End WWII

    We all know the official story of how the Deputy Führer of Germany, Rudolf Hess, in a fit of madness, flew to Scotland on May 10, 1941 in a personal attempt to end the war with Britain. He was taken prisoner, convicted of “crimes against peace,” and served a life sentence until his suicide in 1987. It was a tidy if slightly odd twist to world history. If you’ve read our article on how that war started, you’ll realize the official story, like much of WWII history, is pure propaganda. Hess was not on a personal mission, he had the full authority of the Führer and he had the draft…

  • History

    A Study Guide to Modern European History

    There are a lot of European history books out there, a mountain of them, but most misunderstand, misinterpret or misrepresent the dynamics that drove events. For example, take the Treaty of London 1839 which ended the civil war between the Netherlands and its rebellious southern province. This treaty, which you can read for yourself, does not bind anyone other than Belgium and the Netherlands. Thus when Britain declared war on Germany in 1914, based on this treaty, it did so on entirely fictitious grounds. Germany did not threaten, invade, or declare war on Britain in that war or the next. It was Britain, in both cases, that established a trip…

  • History,  Nationalism

    Germany, 1st in Space

    Germany was the first country in space, not the United States, not Russia: Germany. Its Aggregat 4 (V2) rocket had a first successful test flight on October 3, 1942, reaching an altitude of 84.5 kilometres (52.5 miles). On that day Walter Dornberger, head of the German Army rocket research centre, declared in a speech at Peenemünde: This third day of October, 1942, is the first of a new era in transportation, that of space travel. He was prescient about both space and travel. Further models of the A4 reached an altitude of 108.5 miles, well past the Kármán line of 100 kilometres where space is said to begin. (If it…

  • Allied intervention in Russia 1919
    Culture,  History,  Nationalism

    The Second Invasion of Russia

    Napoleon organized the first invasion, the one illustrated was the second. You will be amazed to know who was behind it, what it was for and who took part. The list of belligerents is impressive: Britain, the United States, France, Japan, India, Canada (yes, Canada), Greece, Czechoslovakia, and many more. While the world was getting over WWI and the Spanish Flu, these Allied armies were trying to crush the Bolshevik revolution. Wikipedia suggests the intervention in the Russian civil war was primarily designed to block supplies getting to Germany. This is dissembling since the intervention continued well after the war was over. No, the real reason was political. The Bolsheviks…

  • Culture,  History,  Nationalism

    The Germany You Never Knew

    Have a look at these women featured on the cover of the German magazine The Young Lady sometime in the 1930’s. Besides being very pretty, they’re also very typical of women on magazine covers in Britain and America at the same time. To add to the experience, listen to the music of the era these women would have been dancing to. Then, if you can stomach it, consider that we tried for five years to kill them in their homes and offices with bombs from the air, and that those who survived were raped and killed on the ground by Russian troops, our rapacious temporary allies. We’ve covered up our…

  • Culture,  History,  Politics

    Goodbye to Berlin

    Christopher Isherwood was a British/American novelist and screenwriter whose best known works, Goodbye to Berlin and Mr. Norris Changes Trains, became the basis of the hit Broadway musical Cabaret. Originally, these novels, based on Isherwood’s diaries of his life as a language teacher in Weimar Berlin, were to be part of a larger work to be called The Lost. Instead, desperate for money, he sliced and diced his diaries into a number of articles, the novel Sally Bowles, and these two overlapping novels. Isherwood went to Berlin to see prep school friend and poet W.H. Auden in March, 1929 and moved to the city in November, 1929. There he discovered…

  • History,  Politics

    Did Churchill sleep with his Daughter-in-Law?

    It is well known Sir Winston Churchill did everything he could to influence the United States to enter the Second World War. This almost certainly included having his Daughter-in-Law, Pamela Churchill (pictured), seduce the married American millionaire, Averell Harriman, President Roosevelt’s special envoy to Britain. He also likely had his Daughter, Sarah, get together with the new American ambassador, “Gil” Winant. The two girls could translate their intimate pillow talk with the Americans into private brefings for the Prime Minister, an invaluable source of information on the United States’ intentions. It was while researching those relationships that I ran across some startling, and incriminating, evidence that Winston had intimate pillow…

  • History,  Race,  Religion

    British Jews, Churchill, and the Second World War

    The man pictured, with the Hitler moustache, is British industrialist Sir Robert Waley Cohen (1877-1952), former Director of Royal Dutch Shell, Vice-Chairman of University College, London; Vice President of the Board of Deputies of British Jews, President of the United Synagogue, and the main creator of the Palestine Corporation. The University of Southhampton says of his career, “Waley Cohen was involved in various international negotiations and deals on behalf of Shell, including with the Egyptian government concerning exploration rights . . . During the First World War, (he) was appointed petroleum adviser to the Army Council (and) was appointed KBE in 1920, in recognition of this work.” “Sir Robert was…