• History

    Famous British Defeats of WWII

    Italian Foreign Minister Count Galeazzo Ciano is credited with writing in his diary, “victory finds a hundred fathers, but defeat is an orphan.” With that in mind, let’s see if we can find fathers for some of the British defeats in the Second World War. My first example is the largest, the diplomatic blunder of the British alliance with Poland first mooted in Parliament by Neville Chamberlain 31 March 1939 and signed on the 25 of August. This insane move by the British Prime Minister threw his country into a world war it could not win by itself and consigned the Polish people to 50 years of servitude. A far…

  • History,  Race

    The German Engineer who Defeated Germany

    Most people think Germany had the best engineers in WWII and so they’re not surprised at the V2 rocket, Tiger tank and the Me262 jet fighter. But they point out America had the best piston-engine fighter, the North American P-51. Well, no, it turns out that was also a German engineering project. I’m stretching that description a little, but not as much as you might think. The plane was designed and built by North American Aviation and the President of the company was the noted engineer, James H. (Dutch) Kindelberger. His nickname referred to his descent from German (Deutsch) immigrants from Nothweiler, a tiny municipality in the Südwestpfalz district of…

  • History

    The SOE, Churchill’s Devious Scheme

    To understand how clever and inhumane was the Special Operations Executive (SOE), one has to flip back the calendar to the Franco-Prussian war of 1870-71. The surprising defeat of the French army at Sedan and capture of Napoleon III Sept. 2, 1870 resulted in shock and consternation in the rest of France. Members of shooting clubs vowed to continue the war by other means. In this they were aided by the Chassepot rifle, a breach loading weapon with an effective range of 1,500 metres (4,900 feet). This allowed them to snipe at German columns from a considerable distance. The response of the German army was ferocious. They summarily executed captured…

  • History,  Politics

    How Germany Tried to End WWII

    We all know the official story of how the Deputy Führer of Germany, Rudolf Hess, in a fit of madness, flew to Scotland on May 10, 1941 in a personal attempt to end the war with Britain. He was taken prisoner, convicted of “crimes against peace,” and served a life sentence until his suicide in 1987. It was a tidy if slightly odd twist to world history. If you’ve read our article on how that war started, you’ll realize the official story, like much of WWII history, is pure propaganda. Hess was not on a personal mission, he had the full authority of the Führer and he had the draft…

  • British Soccer team at Auschwitz
    History,  Nationalism

    Good Times at Auschwitz

    You and most other people think of Auschwitz as a death camp with no purpose except murdering Jews. That’s the postwar view, promoted by survivors and holocaust museums around the world. It’s actual purpose was more mundane, to supply workers for a large synthetic rubber factory, the IG Farben BUNA Werke. This gigantic enterprise near Oświęcim Poland employed 80,000, people, mostly Jews, from three work camps nearby. To keep the workers fit and happy, the camps had recreation fields, a swimming pool, orchestras, theatres, movie nights, and a nursery for the children. This would be perfectly normal for a large factory with a male and female workforce, but it’s unbelievable for…

  • History

    A Study Guide to Modern European History

    There are a lot of European history books out there, a mountain of them, but most misunderstand, misinterpret or misrepresent the dynamics that drove events. For example, take the Treaty of London 1839 which ended the civil war between the Netherlands and its rebellious southern province. This treaty, which you can read for yourself, does not bind anyone other than Belgium and the Netherlands. Thus when Britain declared war on Germany in 1914, based on this treaty, it did so on entirely fictitious grounds. Germany did not threaten, invade, or declare war on Britain in that war or the next. It was Britain, in both cases, that established a trip…

  • History,  Nationalism

    Germany, 1st in Space

    Germany was the first country in space, not the United States, not Russia: Germany. Its Aggregat 4 (V2) rocket had a first successful test flight on October 3, 1942, reaching an altitude of 52.5 miles (84.5 kilometres). On that day Walter Dornberger, head of the German Army rocket research centre, declared in a speech at Peenemünde: This third day of October, 1942, is the first of a new era in transportation, that of space travel. He was prescient about both space and travel. A further model of the A4 on June 20, 1944 reached an altitude of 108.5 miles (174.6 kilometres), well past the Kármán line of 62 miles (100…

  • Allied intervention in Russia 1919
    Culture,  History,  Nationalism

    The Second Invasion of Russia

    Napoleon organized the first invasion, the one illustrated was the second. You will be amazed to know who was behind it, what it was for and who took part. The list of belligerents is impressive: Britain, the United States, France, Japan, India, Canada (yes, Canada), Greece, Czechoslovakia, and many more. While the world was getting over WWI and the Spanish Flu, these Allied armies were trying to crush the Bolshevik revolution. Wikipedia suggests the intervention in the Russian civil war was primarily designed to block supplies getting to Germany. This is dissembling since the intervention continued well after the war was over. No, the real reason was political. The Bolsheviks…

  • Culture,  History,  Nationalism

    The Germany You Never Knew

    Have a look at these women featured on the cover of the German magazine The Young Lady sometime in the 1930’s. Besides being very pretty, they’re also very typical of women on magazine covers in Britain and America at the same time. To add to the experience, listen to the music of the era these women would have been dancing to. Then, if you can stomach it, consider that we tried for five years to kill them in their homes and offices with bombs from the air, and that those who survived were raped and killed on the ground by Russian troops, our rapacious temporary allies. We’ve covered up our…

  • Culture,  History,  Politics

    Goodbye to Berlin

    Christopher Isherwood was a British/American novelist and screenwriter whose best known works, Goodbye to Berlin and Mr. Norris Changes Trains, became the basis of the hit Broadway musical Cabaret. Originally, these novels, based on Isherwood’s diaries of his life as a language teacher in Weimar Berlin, were to be part of a larger work to be called The Lost. Instead, desperate for money, he sliced and diced his diaries into a number of articles, the novel Sally Bowles, and these two overlapping novels. Isherwood went to Berlin to see prep school friend and poet W.H. Auden in March, 1929 and moved to the city in November, 1929. There he discovered…