• History,  Nationalism

    Germany, 1st in Space

    Germany was the first country in space, not the United States, not Russia: Germany. Its Aggregat 4 (V2) rocket had a first successful test flight on October 3, 1942, reaching an altitude of 84.5 kilometres (52.5 miles). On that day Walter Dornberger, head of the German Army rocket research centre, declared in a speech at Peenemünde: This third day of October, 1942, is the first of a new era in transportation, that of space travel. He was prescient about both space and travel. Further models of the A4 reached an altitude of 108.5 miles, well past the Kármán line of 100 kilometres where space is said to begin. (If it…

  • Travel

    Personal, Economic and Political Error of Vacation Travel

    I’ve traveled, you’ve traveled, we’ve all traveled; in the past two decades everyone who could afford it traveled a lot, mostly by air, mostly for pleasure. Until Covid-19 came, along we all thought this trend would increase forever. Now, we’re wondering if anyone will ever travel again. Let’s put that aside and ask a more philosophical question; should we be traveling at all? Indeed what is the rationale for travel, who encourages it and what does it do to people who do it? These are not simple questions, and the default answer, ‘because we enjoy it,’ says nothing. After many years of studying the issue, and travel to five continents,…

  • Economics,  Natiionalism

    Rebuilding the European Union

    The European Union is in danger of collapse for one basic reason. That reason is that political control is not related to the member states’ economic performance. It you compare it to a family, the kids have access to their parents’ credit cards. The damage was caused in two ways. On the one hand, bankers in France and Germany found they could provide hard currency (the Euro) to countries with a lower GDP allowing them to buy goods made in France and Germany. In effect, the difference between their actual economic performance and the one reflected in the currency was a loan. When these subsequently couldn’t be paid off, the…

  • Allied intervention in Russia 1919
    Culture,  History,  Nationalism

    The Second Invasion of Russia

    Napoleon organized the first invasion, the one illustrated was the second. You will be amazed to know who was behind it, what it was for and who took part. The list of belligerents is impressive: Britain, the United States, France, Japan, India, Canada (yes, Canada), Greece, Czechoslovakia, and many more. While the world was getting over WWI and the Spanish Flu, these Allied armies were trying to crush the Bolshevik revolution. Wikipedia suggests the intervention in the Russian civil war was primarily designed to block supplies getting to Germany. This is dissembling since the intervention continued well after the war was over. No, the real reason was political. The Bolsheviks…

  • Culture,  History,  Nationalism

    The Germany You Never Knew

    Have a look at these women featured on the cover of the German magazine The Young Lady sometime in the 1930’s. Besides being very pretty, they’re also very typical of women on magazine covers in Britain and America at the same time. To add to the experience, listen to the music of the era these women would have been dancing to. Then, if you can stomach it, consider that we tried for five years to kill them in their homes and offices with bombs from the air, and that those who survived were raped and killed on the ground by Russian troops, our rapacious temporary allies. We’ve covered up our…

  • Culture,  Health,  Nationalism

    Stop International Air Travel

    How did the Coronavirus get from Hubei, China to the rest of the world, given that it can’t swim, can’t fly and doesn’t have legs? We’ve all known instinctively, haven’t we? It came in the lungs, on the hands and on the luggage of air passengers arriving at our airports Now there’s factual evidence our gut instinct was correct. The Daily Mail reports Brazilian researchers have found air travel was the main driver behind the spread of coronavirus. The busier the airports, the more people got the disease and died. It can help understand what happened if you think of the virus as equivalent to a hand grenade with the…

  • Culture,  History,  Politics

    Goodbye to Berlin

    Christopher Isherwood was a British/American novelist and screenwriter whose best known works, Goodbye to Berlin and Mr. Norris Changes Trains, became the basis of the hit Broadway musical Cabaret. Originally, these novels, based on Isherwood’s diaries of his life as a language teacher in Weimar Berlin, were to be part of a larger work to be called The Lost. Instead, desperate for money, he sliced and diced his diaries into a number of articles, the novel Sally Bowles, and these two overlapping novels. Isherwood went to Berlin to see prep school friend and poet W.H. Auden in March, 1929 and moved to the city in November, 1929. There he discovered…

  • World Economic Forum 2016
    Globalism,  Nationalism

    Globalists are Traitors

    The entire thrust of the second half of the 20th Century was towards greater economic integration. Led by the United States, and cheered on by the defeated powers in WWII, Germany and Japan, the world moved in one direction; towards a future of transportation, integration, and common financing or as we call it today; globalization. The pillars of the new world order were the Bretton Woods Agreement, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, the United States Federal Reserve and the invention of the now ubiquitous shipping container. To the United States, which had largely fought the war against Japan in an effort to dominate China, these efforts were a…