• Culture,  Health,  Nationalism

    Stop International Air Travel

    How did the Coronavirus get from Hubei, China to the rest of the world, given that it can’t swim, can’t fly and doesn’t have legs? We’ve all known instinctively, haven’t we? It came in the lungs, on the hands and on the luggage of air passengers arriving at our airports Now there’s factual evidence our gut instinct was correct. The Daily Mail reports Brazilian researchers have found air travel was the main driver behind the spread of coronavirus. The busier the airports, the more people got the disease and died. It can help understand what happened if you think of the virus as equivalent to a hand grenade with the…

  • Culture,  History,  Politics

    Goodbye to Berlin

    Christopher Isherwood was a British/American novelist and screenwriter whose best known works, Goodbye to Berlin and Mr. Norris Changes Trains, became the basis of the hit Broadway musical Cabaret. Originally, these novels, based on Isherwood’s diaries of his life as a language teacher in Weimar Berlin, were to be part of a larger work to be called The Lost. Instead, desperate for money, he sliced and diced his diaries into a number of articles, the novel Sally Bowles, and these two overlapping novels. Isherwood went to Berlin to see prep school friend and poet W.H. Auden in March, 1929 and moved to the city in November, 1929. There he discovered…

  • World Economic Forum 2016
    Globalism,  Nationalism

    Globalists are Traitors

    The entire thrust of the second half of the 20th Century was towards greater economic integration. Led by the United States, and cheered on by the defeated powers in WWII, Germany and Japan, the world moved in one direction; towards a future of transportation, integration, and common financing or as we call it today; globalization. The pillars of the new world order were the Bretton Woods Agreement, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, the United States Federal Reserve and the invention of the now ubiquitous shipping container. To the United States, which had largely fought the war against Japan in an effort to dominate China, these efforts were a…

  • Health

    Hospital, Office and Residential HVAC Systems may spread Covid-19

    Most hospitals, offices and residential towers built today employ common heating and ventilation systems as a matter of course. They’re efficient, easy to manage and switchable winter and summer from heating to cooling. It’s now turning out, thanks to Covid-19, the whole idea is a colossal mistake. This shouldn’t come as a surprise. Air recirculated through a building passes into and out of each room. Indeed, it passes into and out of each lung of the humans living in the rooms. Keep this in mind when you realize bacteria and viruses are small enough to become aerosolized so they can float into and out of the system like tiny biological…

  • Globalism,  Natiionalism

    Nothing’s Quite as Pretty as a Border Fence in the Morning

    (Sung to the tune of “Mary in the Morning” by Elvis Presley) Nothing’s quite as pretty as a border fence in the morningWhen through a sleepy haze I see it standing thereHard as the hail that smashes invasive Morning GloryIts barbed wire glistening in the bright sun When I wake and see the migrant hordes behind it I want to take up arms and meet them The ache is there so deep, deep inside of me Nothing’s quite as pretty as a border fence in the morning. Chasing a dream of leeching off a welfare state far away, The invaders walk toward our land in the dawn’s first light When…

  • Globalism,  Health

    First Principles are the solution to Virus Prevention

    Elon Musk believes solving problems can by done by reducing them to first principles, taking a problem and boiling it down to its basic parts. He’s proven this by becoming wildly successful in three different disciplines: software, automobiles and rocketry. So what are the principle factors in virus pandemics we need to consider? The first is the infection rate and the second is the fatality rate. Viruses are constantly looking for the right balance of the two so they can spread as widely as possible before killing all their potential hosts. Let’s look at the numbers. Ebola had a high kill rate (50% of cases) but a low infection rate…

  • Culture,  Health

    New Reality for Young Women

    Ask any young woman these days where she plans to retire. Most likely, she hasn’t thought of it, or if she has, one of those delightful seniors retirement centres you see in brochures and TV ads. The problem with this plan is that the covid-19 pandemic has shown seniors homes are a death trap for the elderly during a virus outbreak. The combination of communal living, short staffing and a vulnerable age group is the perfect mix for a deadly purge. I’ll take one province as an example, as reported by the Globe & Mail: In Ontario, among the facilities with the worst outbreaks are Pinecrest Nursing Home in Bobcaygeon,…

  • Health,  Politics

    Public Health Care is Big Brother

    Critics of state medicine have missed the fatal flaw at the heart of public health care. It’s not the quality of the care, the availability, the wait times, or the cost to taxpayers. The core problem with public health care is that doctors instinctively want to curb activities they deem too risky in order to lighten their case loads. The same goes for health care administrators and the politicians responsible for the health care system. Reducing the risk society is exposed to makes the health care system look good because it has less to do. That, in turn, makes officials look good. The problem with this approach is that all…

  • Globalism,  Health,  Multiculturalism,  Natiionalism

    Lessons from the Wuhan Virus

    Every crisis creates its own lessons; stone buildings after the great fire of London, Victorian sewers after the Thames became polluted, gas fires after choking London fogs. Politically, the League of Nations after WWI, the United Nations after WWII, along with the European Union, the GATT and the World Bank. In shipping, enough lifeboats for passengers after the sinking of the Titanic. So what are the lessons we’re learning from the Wuhan Flu, or the Chinese Corona Virus, or if you must, Covid-19? The first, and most important lesson, is that humanity has broken all the natural firewalls between societies with international air travel, meaning a bacterial or viral plague,…

  • History,  Politics

    Did Churchill sleep with his Daughter-in-Law?

    It is well known Sir Winston Churchill did everything he could to influence the United States to enter the Second World War. This almost certainly included having his Daughter-in-Law, Pamela Churchill (pictured), seduce the married American millionaire, Averell Harriman, President Roosevelt’s special envoy to Britain. He also likely had his Daughter, Sarah, get together with the new American ambassador, “Gil” Winant. The two girls could translate their intimate pillow talk with the Americans into private brefings for the Prime Minister, an invaluable source of information on the United States’ intentions. It was while researching those relationships that I ran across some startling, and incriminating, evidence that Winston had intimate pillow…